The Latest

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.
Sep 11, 2014 / 11,058 notes

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via ama-taram)

You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in.

Eliezer Yudkowsky 

Being a “product of their times” is no excuse. Never let someone off the hook for bigotry. 

(via toostoked)

(via ama-taram)

Sep 10, 2014 / 189,013 notes
bootyisagirlsbestfriend:

can we talk about the second definition tho
Sep 10, 2014 / 112,909 notes

bootyisagirlsbestfriend:

can we talk about the second definition tho

(via ama-taram)

brofisting:

kissingcullens:

Sam Wilson, Bucky Barnes, and Steve Rogers freedom sandwich

GOOD
Sep 9, 2014 / 297 notes

brofisting:

kissingcullens:

Sam Wilson, Bucky Barnes, and Steve Rogers freedom sandwich

GOOD

latinorebels:

No explanation needed.
Sep 9, 2014 / 58,153 notes

latinorebels:

No explanation needed.

(via ama-taram)

mogai-special-snowflakes:

bisexual/biromantic snowflake
Sep 8, 2014 / 23 notes

mogai-special-snowflakes:

bisexual/biromantic snowflake

(via ama-taram)

Sep 8, 2014 / 44,827 notes

orphanspace:

archiemcphee:

There’s no question that a stack of fresh pancakes is awesome, but what about one giant fluffy pancake? Today we learned mixing a batch of pancake batter in the bowl of a rice cooker and then cooking it, just like you would when making a batch of rice, creates one great big floofy pancake that instantly reminds us of Totoro’s belly.

What’s more, just like regular pancakes, you can add all sorts of things to the batter, such as cocoa powder or pieces of fruit and chocolate, to further enhance your adorably plump tototorcake.

Head over to RocketNews24 for complete instructions as well as some helpful tips and suggestions.

GAME CHANGER

(via flybaldies)

Sep 7, 2014 / 2,978 notes

a n d   o n c e   t h o s e   4 8   h o u r s   a r e    u p ? 

you stand between me, and the recovery of someone for whom i c a r e with all the depth, i am capable of mustering. she is r e m a r k a b l e in ways, you, could never imagine. i would trade your life f o r h e r s , without a moment’s thought.

(via retrowallflowerss)

Sep 7, 2014 / 7,017 notes

gege-qurban:

charlie7280:

heroscafe:

Her name is Ella Thompson, and Mycroft Holmes calls her an idiot.

Bonus Gif:

image

please stop making conspiracies where there fucking are none.

*Points out mistreatment of POC*

Ugh what are you people talking about johnlock 5eva1111

(via shinyshoeshaveyouseenmymoves)

Sep 6, 2014 / 11,113 notes

elenei:

fandomfatale:

Avengers Nine Nine

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

I’M SO THRILLED MORE PEOPLE ARE DOING THIS OH MY FUCKING GOD

(via shinyshoeshaveyouseenmymoves)